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Animals
speak louder
than words.

Animals
speak louder
than words.

Feed Greatness
Feed Greatness
Message Image to Space Layout Feed Greatness. It's our commitment at Purina.
And when it comes
down to it, words aren't needed. Because if there's greatness on the
inside, it shows on the outside. Animals speak louder than words.
Feed Greatness. It's our commitment at Purina.
And when it comes
down to it, words aren't needed. Because if there's greatness on the
inside, it shows on the outside. Animals speak louder than words.

Stories From Our Farm

For nearly a century at the Purina Animal Nutrition Center, we’ve been learning what helps our animals reach their full potential. And we know if it works for us, it’ll work for other people, too.
 

Information From Our Experts

Animal experts from the Purina Animal Nutrition Center share their knowledge.

Q
How quickly can I get fresh eggs?
A
For instant egg production, purchase started pullets at 18 to 22 weeks of age — more expensive, but almost immediately productive. You may also purchase older hens that are past their most productive stage, but still have another year of reasonable production in them. You will need to rest (molt) these birds for 7 to 8 weeks before allowing them to resume production. If you raise your own layers from hatch, expect them to begin laying at 18 to 20 weeks of age.
Q
What is the impact of providing supplemental nutrition to pregnant cattle?
A
A study published in the Journal of Animal Science (Oct. 9, 2009) revealed striking differences in newborn calves whose dams either received or were denied supplemental nutrition at “critical points” throughout calf gestation. The study indicated that proper nutrition throughout gestation doesn’t just affect fetal development — it actually can program how the fetus will develop long-term.
Q
How can I optimize my nutrition program so my cows produce more milk?
A
Apply technology to your ration. Propel® CHO Transition supplement is a technology that allows us to tweak starch feeding to fresh animals by providing an extremely consistent, rapidly available starch source. This is instrumental in driving microbial production, milk and components. Rally® Dairy Feed is a technology that addresses energy dynamics on a whole different level by providing additional energy in a form that the cow can rapidly utilize, while not contributing to the starch load or fat level of the diet. When you combine these technologies, which work very differently in the cow, the result is potential for more milk in the first 30 days of lactation. This translates into more milk for the entire lactation. We strive to change the slope of the lactation curve in this manner.
Q
How can supplemental feeding potentially increase the number of trophy fish in my pond?
A
Predator fish, such as bass, walleye and larger catfish, eat the bluegills, minnows, small catfish and other forage fish that have been supplied with supplemental feed. By feeding the forage fish, you’ve not only provided yourself with a better catch when you hook a bluegill, you’ve also provided a better meal for your bass. As an added bonus, supplemental feeding also makes the forage fish population more plentiful, because the larger size brought on by feeding encourages earlier breeding — sometimes as early as the first year. In the end, the result is an increase in the capacity of your pond to grow and maintain a greater number of trophy fish.
Q
How can I address pregnancy toxemia and ketosis in my goats?
A
By getting more energy into your late-term pregnant and early-lactation doe. Gradually increase the concentrate (grain) portion of the diet and reduce the hay portion. Grain is higher in energy and will take up less room in the rumen. Feed a good-quality hay that is not too coarse. Forage pellets are another good fiber option for the late-gestation doe. A small amount of fat (corn oil is most palatable) on the feed will also help increase energy intake. Providing more frequent and smaller meals will also help.
Q
What are the clinical symptoms of equine gastric ulcer syndrome (EGUS)?
A
Symptoms include behavioral changes, loss of performance, acting interested in eating but quickly becoming irritable and walking away from feed, recurring mild to moderate colic and a decline in body condition. These are suggestive of, but are not specific to, EGUS; so horses showing any combination of these symptoms should be examined by a veterinarian.
Q
What does “rabbitry biosecurity” mean?
A
Many pathogens and parasites lurk everywhere, just waiting for the opportunity to infect your rabbits, often from sources you might never consider. Introducing biosecurity measures — preventative steps designed to reduce the risk of transmission of infectious diseases — into your rabbitry can help reduce incidence of disease. The goal of a good biosecurity program is to keep out pathogens the animals have not been exposed to, and to minimize the impact of widespread pathogens.
Q
When can I expect to see a difference in my show pigs after starting to feed Paylean®?
A
All pigs are different and will respond a little differently in terms of side effects. However, most pigs with average muscling will respond about the same in terms of days until you see visible effects from feeding Paylean®. Usually, in about 7 days you can see a difference in pigs fed 9 grams/ton. Legal levels of Paylean® range from 4.5 to 9 grams/ton of complete feed.
Q
Why can’t I just switch right away?
A
Species such as guinea pigs and rabbits have very delicate digestive systems that rely on a consistent diet. Changing a diet immediately, or providing too many treats at one time, can cause a disruption to the ecosystem of microbes in the GI tract and lead to GI upset. Pets such as birds and guinea pigs are very finicky eaters. Birds especially are very attuned to the shape, size and color of their food. Switching a bird’s diet abruptly may lead to digestive upset, or worse, your bird will stop eating completely. You can change your pet’s diet, you just need to do it slowly.
Q
What challenges does weaning present for young pigs?
A
Challenges include an abrupt change from a liquid to a solid diet that contains ingredients that may not be easily digestible to the young pig. Immediately after weaning, the digestive system of the pig has to adapt to a new feeding regime with respect to enzyme secretion. In addition, the young pig is presented with a new social structure. Combined, these effects disrupt nutrient intake that is necessary to maintain gut integrity and function.
Q
What are the potential dangers to deer if they consume too much starch?
A
Like all ruminants, deer need a proper rumen environment to maintain the populations of microbes that digest the plants they eat. Normal rumen pH is very mildly acidic. However, too much starch, especially if consumed in a short time, results in a great deal of lactic acid being produced in the rumen. This drops the pH, making the rumen much more acidic and killing off the vital microbes. This can result in founder, acidosis and even death.