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Animals
speak louder
than words.

Animals
speak louder
than words.

 

 FEATURED PURINA NUTRITION ARTICLES 

Stories From Our Farm

For nearly a century at the Purina Animal Nutrition Center, we’ve been learning what helps our animals reach their full potential. And we know if it works for us, it’ll work for other people, too.
 

 FIND ANSWERS 

Information From Our Experts

Animal experts from the Purina Animal Nutrition Center share their knowledge.

Q
What type of housing do I need to provide for my flock?
A
Be sure to thoroughly research the needs of individual poultry breeds before purchasing them. Some have very specific environmental needs and may not mix well with the average backyard flock. Chicks need adequate space and warmth. Some of the equipment and supplies you’ll need for raising chicks are heat lamps and/or brooder stove, feeders, waterers and a thermometer. All necessary equipment and supplies can be obtained from your local Purina dealer.
Q
Do my cows need different minerals during calving season?
A
This is one of the most important times of the production cycle to provide a good balanced mineral program. Minerals are very important for problem free calving and the initiation of reproduction after calving. A good balanced mineral program will help the start of estrus cycles prior to the breeding season.
Q
Why is it important to sanitize calf navel-dipping equipment on a regular basis?
A
The navel acts as a “highway” to the bloodstream, so it’s important to stop pathogens from being passed on to the calf. Dipping a navel with dirty disinfectant defeats the purpose of disinfecting. If present in high quantities, organic matter can overcome the disinfectant. Regularly change out disinfectant and clean navel dippers. If navels are being clipped, sanitize scissors between uses with Nolvasan®.
Q
How can supplemental feeding impact more than the fish it is meant to feed?
A
At first glance, supplemental feeding seems to benefit only those fish such as bluegills, sunfish, hybrid striped bass, catfish, minnows and other species that directly consume the feed. However, feeding fish also supplies nutrients to the water, which enable phytoplankton to grow. Since phytoplankton are at the very bottom of the food chain, they affect all the animals above them.
Q
Why is it important for ruminant animals such as goats to be able to burp?
A
The rumen produces a lot of gas from the fermentation of food, and ruminant animals normally get rid of this gas and avoid bloat by belching. If something blocks the escape of gas from the rumen, however, the rumen will begin to expand. You will notice a large bulge on the animal’s left side, as if it had swallowed a soccer ball.
Q
What can cause joint damage in performance horses?
A
Wear and tear on the skeletal system of a performance horse, particularly the cartilage surfaces of joints, may be an inevitable consequence of exercise or simply getting older. Degenerative joint disease (DJD), sometimes referred to as osteoarthritis (OA), is believed to increase with age.
Q
What is rabbit enteritis and what is its cause?
A
Enteritis, or digestive tract inflammation, is one of the most common disease conditions in rabbits. Unfortunately, enteritis itself is usually a symptom and has many potential causes. There are several diseases that result in enteritis, but there are also many management mistakes that can lead to this potentially deadly condition.
Q
Can isolation of incoming pigs be used to reduce exposure and spread of disease in pigs?
A
If a customer has the facilities, he might consider keeping incoming pigs separated from the rest of the pigs for 14 to 21 days after arrival. Usually, in commercial practice a longer period is required, but from a practical standpoint, 14 to 21 days will incubate most pathogens and allow symptoms to appear. If symptoms do appear, the pigs should be isolated for an additional 30 days until the disease has been treated and the pigs have recovered. This should reduce the number of pigs affected and the need for additional pigs to be treated in most cases.
Q
Has this more stable vitamin C source been created and is it being used in small-pet food?
A
Modern technology has allowed us to significantly increase the shelf life of vitamin C using a stabilized version, L-ascorbyl-2-polyphosphate. The phosphate is broken off during digestion, making the ascorbic acid completely available to the animal. This ingredient is heat stable and shelf stable, making it the perfect option to ensure your pet is getting all the vitamin C it needs!
Q
Why can weaning be difficult for young pigs?
A
The pig must cope with a variety of factors, including separation from the sow, the transition from highly digestible milk to a less digestible and more complex solid feed, a new environment, movement and separation from littermates, and exposure to unfamiliar pigs.
Q
What makes Purina® Game Bird Chow® products different than other brands?
A
Purina® Game Bird Chows® products are manufactured according to strict specifications. Purina® Game Bird Chows® products are not commercial turkey or poultry rations, they are unique products for unique species grown for unique reasons. This is important because game birds eat such a relatively small quantity of feed. A quail chick, for example, eats only a thimbleful of feed in four days. Every bit of Purina® Game Bird Chow® products are Micro-Mixed® with Purina’s proprietary process. Every bite brings your birds complete, wholesome nutrition. Purina’s Life Cycle Program can help you efficiently raise all types of game birds from hatch to release or finish.