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    No Matter Why You Raise Goats, Better Nutrition Can Help Them Be Their Best.

     FEATURED GOAT ARTICLES 

    Lessons from the Farm

    What we’ve learned can help you care for your goats.

    Mikelle Roeder, Ph.D.

    Getting Your Kid Off To A Healthy Start

    Mikelle Roeder, Ph.D.

    Caprine Arthritis Encephalitis in Goats: A Devast...

    Purina Animal Nutrition Expert

    Causes of Bloat in Goats

     
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     GOAT PRODUCTS 

    Give Your Goats the Best Nutrition Possible

    We offer a variety of goat feeds and supplements that contain the highest-quality ingredients. So you can find what’s best for your goats.

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    Information from Our Goat Experts

    Animal experts at the Purina Animal Nutrition Center share their knowledge about goats.

    Q
    How can I address pregnancy toxemia and ketosis in my goats?
    A
    By getting more energy into your late-term pregnant and early-lactation doe. Gradually increase the concentrate (grain) portion of the diet and reduce the hay portion. Grain is higher in energy and will take up less room in the rumen. Feed a good-quality hay that is not too coarse. Forage pellets are another good fiber option for the late-gestation doe. A small amount of fat (corn oil is most palatable) on the feed will also help increase energy intake. Providing more frequent and smaller meals will also help.


    The Industry’s Best Believe in Us

    Our talented ambassador team is nationally recognized. These accomplished professionals devote their time and effort to share their knowledge and skill with the youth and families of this industry.

    • Mike Burr Director of Process Re...
    • Mikelle Roeder, Ph.D. Multi-Species Nutritio...
    • Kent Lanter, MBA Manager of Process Res...
    • Gordon Ballam, Ph.D. Research & Technical S...